Digital Boundaries and Teen Dating Violence: Part 2

Guest post by: Emily Eisele, Prevention Education Specialist, HAVEN

When Is It Abuse?
Teens are often texting or tweeting, but how do you know if it is crossing the boundaries of a healthy relationship? It’s important to address with teens using media the dynamics of power and control. Do you feel afraid to leave your phone unattended? Do you feel like there will be social or relationship consequences if you don’t tell your partner where you are at all times? Every teen has texted “where r u?” to a friend or partner, but if there is a threat carried with it, that is abuse. Finding out if a teen feels fear in their relationship is essential to identifying abuse.

Making it clear that abuse does not have to be physical is also a hurdle to clear when discussing teen dating violence: many young people feel that digital harassment is a normal social experience. Labelling this behavior as abuse takes away the power of the abuser, and may be a first step for the target of abuse to find it unacceptable and get help. It is also essential to understand that dating violence uses a pattern of tactics to take power and control away from the victim, and that it escalates over time.

The importance of intervention is clear, considering the impact of teen dating violence on future partnerships. Disturbingly, experiences of controlling behavior, harassment and intimidation often affect how teens’ future relationships are formed. The CDC recently published disturbing statistics that 22% of women and 15% of men experiencing violence as adults first experienced relationship violence between the ages of 11 and 17.

While increased secrecy and independence during teen years is normal, withdrawal and other behaviors may be red flags. Signs a teen may be experiencing abuse, digital or otherwise, include:

  • Extreme fear or emotion about constant access to phone or internet
  • Depression or anxiety
  • A dramatic change in clothing, weight or interests after beginning relationship
  • Seeing friends and doing things they used to care about less and less
  • Fear of partner’s reaction, or constant worry about what their partner thinks
  • Fear of not texting or calling back right away

Responding to Teen Dating Violence
Being open to listening, not judging is essential to supporting any person experiencing intimate partner violence—and teens are no exception. Never blame the target of abuse by asking why she made X decision, but remind her that the abuse is not her fault, and is the choice of the abuser. Focus on behaviors—“It seems scary that she constantly needs to know where you are” instead of, “She’s controlling, I don’t like it.” Offering options instead of commands, ultimatums or restrictions can help bolster a teen’s self-esteem and help them make the right choice. Make resources available, like HAVEN’s Crisis and Support Line, and sites like www.loveisrespect.org where a teen can research and determine for themselves whether they are experiencing abuse. And talk openly about healthy relationship skills, because positive alternatives are a formative part of strong personal boundaries and partnerships. If you can, plan next steps together for digital and physical safety.

As a community, it is crucial that we work together to educate ourselves about the root causes of intimate partner violence, and come to an understanding as a community of how the dynamics of power and control operate. Talk with your school about peer groups for media safety, and media literacy for faculty and parents. Contact the Prevention Education team at HAVEN to request educational workshops and our leadership programs that discuss healthy relationships, consent, and teen dating violence.

Keep in mind that social media can be a powerful tool for social change among teens as well—support peer led groups at your local high school or middle school that engage in and support online media campaigns about consent, healthy masculinity, and ending violence against women. All people deserve to live free of fear. Let’s support teens with the tools to create social change.

HAVEN operates an anonymous Crisis and Support Line for anyone who is experiencing abuse, or who thinks a friend may be experiencing abuse and has questions. It is available and anonymous 24/7 at 877-922-1274. Crisis and Support Chat, and more information about our Prevention Education Program, are both available at www.haven-oakland.org.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under HAVEN news

A Sweet Gesture

Swing

Swinging—back and forth, back and forth. Sitting on a swing has always been, for me, a moment of bliss. It has been a way to relax, unwind, reflect, and sometimes to have incredibly intimate conversations with friends and family. I can recall great moments on the swing set in elementary school, laughing and spending time with friends, carefree and easy. I recall in the early months of building my relationship with my now husband, special conversations while spent on a swing set near a trail that we often hiked in the evenings. Experiencing my first Arizona harvest moon with him while slowly swinging is just one special memories of those years. As a new mom, I remember many moments on swing sets with Colin, having great conversations as well as a lot of laughs. Etched in my memory for what I hope is forever is spending time with my parents on the “singing swing” at our family cottage.

When we open our new HAVEN Community Center later this year, an important feature of the new playground will be a swing set. Sure it will be lots of fun for the children who stay at our emergency shelter but it will also have a significant therapeutic impact. Kids, and many adults, express their feelings often through play and art. Imagine the conversations about fear and anger of the past and future, the calming nature of swinging back and forth during a troubling time. Imagine a child talking about having to start a new school, of having to testify during court and sharing details of the abuse they witnessed. Then imagine a couple of kids laughing and just being kids. All on a simple swing set.

This Valentine’s Day, we collectively will spend millions on cards, candy, and flowers. Nice sentiments for those we love. Let’s consider a slightly smaller box of candy this year and make a contribution to HAVEN’s swing set, giving a child a moment of peace, a moment of bliss on a swing. Click here to give children in our community what they want and deserve most—a childhood that is safe and fun.

Leave a comment

Filed under HAVEN news

Digital Boundaries and Teen Dating Violence: Part 1

Guest post by: Emily Eisele, Prevention Education Specialist, HAVEN

Gender-based violence is present in every demographic of race, income bracket, sexual orientation, community, and age. Teen dating relationships are no exception. Intimidation, harassment and stalking are happening in middle schools and high schools in our communities. An open discussion about intimate partner violence, digital tools of abuse and ways to help is badly needed. But first, let’s define teen dating violence: it is the use of physical, sexual, emotional or verbal force by one dating partner towards another dating partner to maintain power and control. Abuse can cause injury and even death but it doesn’t have to be physical.

Let’s stop there a moment and reiterate: Doesn’t. Have. To be physical.

While sexual and physical violence is certainly occurring in teen relationships—an American Medical Journal publication stated that 1 in 5 high school girls reported being assaulted at some point in their relationships—verbal abuse and digital harassment is more difficult to identify and address. Many tactics of abuse are well hidden by the abuser, and often are not technically illegal. Importantly, verbal and emotional abuse is just as devastating—if not more so—than physical. Survivors tell us at HAVEN that the scars of emotional abuse last for years, long after the relationship has ended. It is often minimized, and is certainly underreported.

This issue is further complicated by the digital world young people are now immersed in. A 2010 study by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that young people between the age of 8 to 18 are consuming media—social networking, phone surfing, texting, watching TV—7.5 hours per day on average. See how this compares to adult consumption here.  How is this technological immersion and the public sharing of social media changing dating relationships for teens? How can we recognize when teens close to us may be in an abusive relationship, and how can we help?

As we increasingly have our heads in the Cloud, there is a serious need to address digital safety and personal boundaries for young people growing up in this culture.

Digital Harassment

In a recent Associated Press poll, 56% percent of young respondents reported experiences of abuse online or through social media. While the level of public exposure of our lives rises, and becomes more acceptable, new platforms for verbal abuse or public humiliation—both abuse tactics for maintaining power and control—open up. Access to media on mobile devices and increasing anonymity also allows for concerted efforts to bully and abuse within dating relationships. Abusive teens may ask their friends to harass their partner on social media, or through constant texting or calling. Even more frightening, teens run the risk of being stalked or harassed constantly outside of school, or even after they move away. Other forms of digital abuse include, but are not limited to:

  • threatening texts
  • demeaning or embarrassing posts on facebook
  • pressure to send sexual photos
  • checking the victim’s email or social media accounts
  • punishing partner for not responding to texts quickly enough
  • creating a profile to harass or check up on partner
  • using media or phones to keep tabs on a partner.

The normalization of constant digital connection may obscure the reality that teens in our lives do not have strong boundaries in their relationships, and that they may be experiencing abuse. How do we recognize, and help teens recognize, when checking social media or connecting through a phone crosses the line into a controlling relationship? When someone is asking “where r u”, too often?

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month. If you are being abused or think your teen is in an abusive relationship, HAVEN is here to help. Call our 24-hour Crisis and Support Line at 877-922-1274.

Stay tuned for Part 2, where we will address identifying teen dating violence, and what to do about it.

Leave a comment

Filed under HAVEN news

Student Project Raises Awareness on Domestic Violence

BuildaHaven_fb_shared5

Guest post by: Catherine Gaisor, Communications Specialist, Mercedes-Benz Financial Services

Supporting the community went beyond making a financial contribution when Mercedes-Benz Financial Services (MBFS) partnered with the College for Creative Studies (CCS) Graphic Design program to sponsor a social media campaign to help spread awareness of HAVEN. As Oakland County’s only comprehensive program for victims of sexual assault and domestic violence, HAVEN provides shelter, counseling, advocacy and educational programming to nearly 30,000 people each year.

The semester long project challenged students with creating a campaign that would appeal to millennials through education and action. Remember the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge that went viral and raised millions of dollars? Well, a similar end-goal was established for the HAVEN project, to help increase donations and awareness of domestic violence.

The students were split into two teams and worked to design and produce separate campaigns.

“It was so refreshing to see the student’s interest in the topic and we appreciated that each individual embraced our mission,” said Rachel Decker, Director of Development for HAVEN. “We are so proud to have such inspiring campaigns for HAVEN.”

One project, “Build a HAVEN,” focused on creating a safe atmosphere. Even the typography tells a story, with each letter fitting into one another. The second team’s project, “All or Zero,” focused on a call to action by explaining it takes everybody to make a difference.

The “Build a HAVEN” campaign officially launches this month with the second campaign to follow later in the year.

“This project benefits more than us. The message is so much bigger than just a class assignment,” said CCS student Samantha Griffith. “We even realized certain situations in our own lives that have been affected by domestic violence and we were instilled with a new sensitivity to the issue.”

Both campaigns include a video, social media posts and an opportunity to donate to HAVEN. Using specific hashtags will allow the posts to be shared on various online platforms.

“I’m so proud of all the students in the class. Instead of working in separate teams, they decided to work collectively and each delivered strong campaigns,” said Susan Laporte, CCS Graphic Design Associate Professor. “In all my years teaching at CCS, this is one of the best team projects I have had the honor in facilitating.”

Leave a comment

Filed under HAVEN news

End Stalking Before it Begins

2015NSAM Banner 2-400x218

Guest post by: Kristopher Kole Wyckhuys, Prevention Education Specialist, HAVEN

This month is Stalking Awareness Month. In its most fundamental form stalking is defined as any unwanted obsessive attention or contact between individuals or groups of people. The contact may be physical or through technology and directly or indirectly communicates an explicit or implied threat, leaving the victim feeling fearful or intimidated.

Education around legal definitions, signs of stalking, and resources for victims is necessary and important. As a Prevention Education Specialist I understand the importance of also talking about primary prevention, or ending stalking behaviors before they ever begin. In order to do that we would need to take a closer look at entitlement, respect, and consent.

Primary prevention best practices would have the message of consent and respect come at an early age. Teaching children to respect bodily autonomy and consent should be delivered through mixed methods, from multiple sources, and at several stages of child development. Accountable communities would teach children the ethics of consent in such a way that encourages children to want to be respectful of each other’s boundaries and to know that their own bodies and personal space should also be respected – even by parents, relatives, teachers or other figures of authority. We would teach them that violating bodily autonomy would never be socially acceptable or tolerated.

I recently met with a group of teachers and counselors to discuss alarming behavioral issues that have swept their 5th grade classes. I was told stories of children leaving repeated love notes and death threats in lockers and desks, stories of kids following other kids around the playground even after having been asked to stop, going through belongings without consent, and harassing and intimidating behaviors and threats being delivered through text message, social media and other technology mediums. Their request was that I add a section within our Gender Respect curriculum related to bodily autonomy, consent and age appropriate bystander intervention.

At first glance, and out of context, these children’s behaviors sound strikingly similar to stalking behaviors. These behaviors are often dismissed as typical child development or even as “cute” or expected between children. This normalization of disregard for consent is absorbed by kids at extremely young ages and may lead to harmful behaviors when children mature into adulthood.

Many parents, teachers and media outlets unknowingly teach children harmful ideas about consent.

Talking to children and teaching them consent and respectful behavior at early ages isn’t difficult and here is a basic guide to start:

  1. Ask for consent before doing anything to a child’s body. Ask before picking them up, hugging, tickling, cuddling, or kissing their cheek. Respect their answer if they say no or ask you to stop and teach them to do the same.
  2. Respect a child’s request to be put down if you’re holding them. Never require them to hug or kiss a relative unless they say it’s okay. Children communicate lack of consent through both verbal and non-verbal cues and it’s important to recognize signs and teach them to do the same.
  3. Teach children that their body belongs to them and its okay to tell a grown up or another child not to touch them, hug them, or kiss them.
  4. In instances where a child’s consent to touch their body is overridden in a need to protect from harm (A speeding train is about to hit them and you need to pull them to safety), apologize for surprising them and grabbing them without asking first, then explain why it was necessary to do so in that moment.
  5. Teach children that when they violate personal space, boundaries and/or consent of other children, it may be scary and hurtful to the other child. Talk about the feelings that may come up when someone doesn’t respect personal space and how to avoid hurting others in that way.

HAVEN is Oakland County Michigan’s center for the treatment and prevention of domestic violence and sexual assault. For additional information or to learn more about Prevention Education options in your school system contact HAVEN’s Prevention Education Department at 248-334-1284, ext. 360.

Leave a comment

Filed under HAVEN news

Stalking: It’s Not Okay

Stalking: Know it. Name it. Stop it.

Guest post by: Kristopher Kole Wyckhuys, Prevention Education Specialist, HAVEN

January is Stalking Awareness Month. In its most fundamental form stalking is defined as any unwanted obsessive attention or contact between individuals or groups of people. The contact may be physical or through technology and directly or indirectly communicates an explicit or implied threat, leaving the victim feeling fearful or intimidated.

Legal and societal definitions and understandings of stalking can vary across cultures, over states, through communities and within the anti-violence movement. The criminal and terrifying reality is that most stalkers feel entitled to track their victims like prey and the behaviors may include many forms:

  • Any actions, attention and/or behaviors that leave the victim feeling violated, harassed, intimidated, threatened, fearful and/or controlled
  • Physically following the victim, driving by or stopping in unannounced
  • Repeated phone calls, text/email messages, even when ignored or the victim asks them to stop
  • Monitoring technology, hacking social media accounts, using GPS or hidden cameras, accessing public records, intercepting mail or going through trash
  • Sending unwanted gifts, letters, or cards
  • Showing up at the victims work, classes, hangouts, or relatives homes
  • Damaging property, threatening harm to the victim or property, family, friends and/or pets

Any one of these behaviors as a stand-alone entity may not be defined as stalking. According to the Stalking Resource Center an excellent working definition would include: a pattern of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear. The statistics around stalking victimization, impact and lethality are equally as alarming.

HAVEN is Oakland County Michigan’s center for the treatment and prevention of domestic violence and sexual assault. For additional information and victim resources pertaining to stalking, domestic violence and sexual assault you can access your local domestic violence agency, this national hotline, or contact HAVEN’s crisis and support line for information or support.

Leave a comment

Filed under HAVEN news

HAVEN Marks 40th Anniversary of Supporting and Empowering Survivors

Print

Some people think I am crazy, but I have loved every birthday that I have had.  It most likely comes from being the youngest child in a large family!

So I am fully embracing HAVEN’s 40th Birthday in 2015! A birthday for an organization, much like a birthday of an individual, is often a time to reflect back on accomplishments, as well as look forward to the future. And like an individual, HAVEN has had interesting growing pains and rites of passage.

If we look back at those early years of childhood, HAVEN worked to establish itself in the community. Many nonprofits fail in the early years as they struggle for relevance, funding, and community support. Thanks to the hard work of our founders, HAVEN was able to demonstrate to the community that the occurrence of sexual violence in our community required attention. Adding domestic violence to the original mission furthered the conversation in Oakland County and our quick growth in the number of survivors served demonstrated a significant need.

In our teen years, some might have said that we became a bit rebellious by challenging the norm. HAVEN was a key player in addressing issues such as the marital rape exception law, advocating for Personal Protection Order laws and specialized training for law enforcement officers. And of course, what would teen years be without a big party…so we launched our Gala event (formerly known as Promenade of Hope) and our annual Gift Giveaway Program.

In our 20’s, we began to hit our groove. By this time we had become an established organization but recognized that we needed to achieve stronger financial viability and lobbying for the federal Violence Against Women Act became critical. Throughout the 90’s, our Prevention Education programming took off with greater reach into middle schools, high schools, Oakland University, and the Oakland County Jail. HAVEN also experienced the purchase of our first PC’s, the “birth” of our prevention mascot Daisy, and we became a key member of several state and local teams at the forefront of our issues. We also successfully launched our START forensic examination program. And like many in their 20’s, we experienced our first major crisis – a fire at our shelter.

Our most recent decade, our 30’s, saw growth by adding the Personal Protection Office. It was also a time when we began to experience growing pains. Feeling that our first home, a major fixer upper, had grown cramped for our needs we began to think through the decision of renting vs buying a new space. We also took a realistic look at our programming against best practices and future trends and saw an opportunity for growth. And as we approached the wise old age of 40 – we decided to buy land and build a new facility!

So as we enter our 40th year, we are not only grateful for our past, but we are excited about our future! Before we close the books on 2015, we will officially move into our new home! More importantly, we will change the fundamental way in which we serve survivors. We will become more effective, more efficient and more financially stable….qualities that every 40-year-old strives for!

Another quality that many of us don’t learn until our later years is gratitude. So in closing, I want to say a very heartfelt thank you to each of you who have supported us. Whether you have been a part of our past or are helping us move into the future…..you have played a vitally important role. We would not have come this far or have so much to look forward to without your support. Thank you and here’s to another successful 40 years!

Leave a comment

Filed under HAVEN news